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Satanta
Advanced Member


USA
173 Posts

Posted - 12/18/2017 :  9:10:59 PM  Show Profile Send Satanta a Private Message  Reply with Quote
My new post.
I have done some looking at the well known Lee cheaper too purchase old school stuff. I assume that is what they mean by hand loading?
Very simple set up and sure it works just great.
I watched several video's on loading. All with Lee for my search.
Good stuff, learned a lot, but as expected, hard to view due to lighting, shadows, and body parts.
If I do go this direction in the future. I can tell already I want the bench press with the rotated 3 or 4 hole receiver for the dies?
Or is that silly for a 25 - 50 round load process?
I was impressed is all. That really means nothing in the long run.
He was also using the Lee Zip cutter for re-sizing case length.
Looked awesome, but made me think of pulling on a lawn mower. That cord and things will go first. Any replies on this one?
New post, new input.
If I were to resize a case, I don't want to do it by hand. My hands cramp up often. Maybe I don't get the jest of old school. But it does look like a one on one big time. All done by hand strength.
The press cuts those corners. Gotta love leverage. Maybe even more so with the crimping?
Starting points? I have the brass. What is the next step?
Remove old primers? That one was left out of the video's.
I would assume after the primer removal which is not said how. The case resizing would be next.
I am 100% virgin on this. I don't mind feeling stupid at all.
I have plenty of empty one time fired cases.
This will be a build as I can afford. I just would like to if nothing else. Get to first base for prep on what I have.
Which looks like little without a case resizer of sort.
Primer removal? Case cleaning? Tumbler? All is in prep to moving on.



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americanboy
Advanced Member



USA
341 Posts

Posted - 12/19/2017 :  05:48:59 AM  Show Profile Send americanboy a Private Message  Reply with Quote
A single-stage press is all that's required and I often use a Lee hand-press. You don't even have to mount that on a bench. The dies will usually have some instructions on how to use them. With the 30-carbine, case-lube and a trimmer is a must. I'd recommend something like the Lee Quick-Trim. You'll need some method to meter your powder charge, but that's not rocket-science either. H110 is a good powder and an empty 9MM case throws 14-grains. You'll need a good measuring tool to check the depth of bullet seating when you set-up your dies for that stage. A case tumbler is not completely necessary, but will make it easier on your equipment in the long run.

This could go on-and-on and I would recommend that you seek-out and find someone local that reloads. There is a good reason why I suggest that unless one shoots a lot of 30-carbine....it's not economical to reload just for that cartridge, but it's fun! Reloading for other straight-wall cases is not nearly as complicated as reloading the 30-carbine. I cast my own slugs for 38, 45 and 9MM and reload those rounds for like 5 to 6-cents a pop. You'll be investing close to 20-cents in each 30-carbine round (projectile, primer and powder) using your own brass.

Edited by - americanboy on 12/19/2017 05:50:27 AM
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daboone
Junior Member



USA
72 Posts

Posted - 12/19/2017 :  06:57:38 AM  Show Profile Send daboone a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Reloading isn't complicated. If you decide to go with a Lee press or kit be sure to get their manual. Every hard-backed manual has a good reloading section. Before you buy any equipment get a reloading manual and study it. A manual will provide the answers you have. My dad taugh me to reload but I have several friends who learned by studying their manuals. As mentioned you might ask the store if there is neighbor willing to assist.

The Lee Loaders work but they are a bit tedious when I comes to production. The next step up is the Hand Press. It is a good press and I do use mine when loading at the range. Their single stages are all reliable platforms. Even if you got a progressive later on one of those single stage press will find frequent use. I use the Lee case gauge trimmers for several cartridges. They are the K.I.S.S of trimmers and for me work with consistent accuracy.
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shadycon
Veteran Member



USA
1373 Posts

Posted - 12/19/2017 :  08:09:22 AM  Show Profile Send shadycon a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I use an old turret press. Once set up [ I use a dial caliper] it is as fast as you put in components and pull handle.

M1's-R-FUN!!!!!!!!!!!!
TSMG's-R-MORE-FUN!!!!!
ENJOY LIFE & HAVE FUN!!
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HB of CJ
Junior Member



USA
77 Posts

Posted - 12/19/2017 :  1:40:00 PM  Show Profile Send HB of CJ a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Fun to learn up about the joys of hand loading. Reloading and hand loading mean the same thing. Perhaps hand loading means the Old Coot is more old.

If you have or can access a computer it is very convenient to pull down and learn up on the ins and outs of hand loading. There is a mountain of info available.

I, (we) used to hand load way back in High School. About 1964. M1 Carbine. We had a California State Guard Armorer give us Boy Scouts some good pointers.

Do not be put off by the shear size of available information. Start reading up. All fun and easy. The .30 Carbine round can be at times kinda tricky to hand load.

If I can do it, you can do it. No rocket science. Just a few things one needs to be aware of and the reasons/history why. We might re start hand loading.

You can start very simple and kinda non expensive. Try to do the purchasing research where you do not have to duplicate stuff as you progress. All fun and easy.
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jimb16
Moderator



USA
3116 Posts

Posted - 12/19/2017 :  8:34:43 PM  Show Profile Send jimb16 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Do yourself a huge favor. Before you do anything else, get a Lyman reloading manual and read it! It will tell you all the basics and a lot more. Plus you will have reloading data to use when you are ready. Once you have gone thru it. you will have plenty of questions to ask for further information.
I also recommend a basic reloading set like the Lee Anniversary set which will include all of the basic equipment that you will need except for the actual reloading dies which are caliber specific. And it is also one of the least expensive ways to get started.

OGCA Lifer,NRA Life member, son of a 325th GIR Glider Rider
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myname
Advanced Member



USA
214 Posts

Posted - 12/20/2017 :  12:41:33 PM  Show Profile Send myname a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I loaded quite a few .30 carbine over a year or so. At least 2000 rounds. I'd advise you look for a good deal on a power trimmer. I sold one used recently with a bunch of brass, and some dies. I would have pieced it out, but got no takers for any of the stuff on the M1 Carbine forum. I lucked out running into a guy at a tactical rifle shoot who took whole the lot from me for the asking price. Anyway, my RCBS power trimmer, had a head that would cut and chamfer in one pass. I'd think a good deal on a used one would be under $150. I paid ~$300 new.
Really liked the coated bullets and had switched to Bayou Bullets after loading a bunch of hard cast Penn Bullets. You can buy them (either type) for 7-8 cents each and the coated bullets won't lead the barrel or the gas piston port. Hard cast aren't supposed lead up to either but I found they did, after I'd shot about 1500 of them. And I was shooting very mild loads 115 gr bullets over 12.5 gr of 4227 so I don't think I was exceeding the velocity recommended for hard cast lead.
I decided to dedicate my Hornady AP press to doing 9mm so that is the main reason I got out of reloading for the .30 carbine.

Edited by - myname on 12/20/2017 12:42:26 PM
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BEYU
Advanced Member



USA
298 Posts

Posted - 12/20/2017 :  12:45:10 PM  Show Profile Send BEYU a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by jimb16

Do yourself a huge favor. Before you do anything else, get a Lyman reloading manual and read it! It will tell you all the basics and a lot more. Plus you will have reloading data to use when you are ready. Once you have gone thru it. you will have plenty of questions to ask for further information.
I also recommend a basic reloading set like the Lee Anniversary set which will include all of the basic equipment that you will need except for the actual reloading dies which are caliber specific. And it is also one of the least expensive ways to get started.



Jim's advice as always is very good.

I started reloading .38 special in 2016 as a complete newbie. My wife bought the Lyman manual for me as a Christmas present. I read it carefully, and added lots of underlining and notes in the margins.

Then I started a search online for the equipment I would need, frequently consulting various sources online for the advice of experienced reloaders. I made an extensive list of the equipment I would need. I checked online reviews to find out what works and what does not (other peoples' opinions, of course).

I ended up going with a Lee Classic Turret Press, Lee carbide dies, as well as other stuff I would need. All told, I got into reloading for about $350 to start.

I also made my own reloading bench, but that's another tale.

The Lee equipment is cheaper than some of the other manufacturers, but so far has worked out fine. Just don't beat on it with a hammer! LOL

I bought some other stuff that was rather cheap, but I figure if it breaks, I'll replace it piece-meal with better stuff.

Just recently I started reloading for .30 carbine. I bought a Lyman Universal Case Trimmer for that.

BEYU

"Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety."

- Benj. Franklin
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americanboy
Advanced Member



USA
341 Posts

Posted - 12/20/2017 :  1:15:49 PM  Show Profile Send americanboy a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Need to know what not to consider as well. Go ahead and get a decent case-trimmer. Some folks have success with the Lee hand-held trimmer, but I have not. If you have brass of varying thickness, you have to "tailor" the pin. The first (and only) one I tried would not go into the case mouth. I called Lee and they told me to either sand-down the pin to fit or send them a piece of brass and the pin and they would polish it to fit. That was enough for me to toss it in the trash.
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BEYU
Advanced Member



USA
298 Posts

Posted - 12/20/2017 :  2:14:19 PM  Show Profile Send BEYU a Private Message  Reply with Quote
So far I have found the Lyman case trimmer to work fine. I bought the power take off to allow using a power drill, but have not yet felt a need to use it. Later, as I get faster, I may try it.

BEYU

"Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety."

- Benj. Franklin
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Satanta
Advanced Member



USA
173 Posts

Posted - 12/20/2017 :  6:48:57 PM  Show Profile Send Satanta a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Wow! I feel like it's Christmas already with receiving all the great replies. Many thanks.
The Lyman manual it shall be for starters.
Was at the range today and spoke a little with a fellow about reloads. It was cold as heck and we did our thing and visited little. But the lead bullets was the main topic. He loads all his 40 stuff casting with wheel weights. Said the FMJ shells would wear a barrel out much faster? Same as JHP.
Myname said he uses and likes the coated Bayou bullets? Are they all lead? Any other favorites for the 30 carbine?
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BEYU
Advanced Member



USA
298 Posts

Posted - 12/20/2017 :  9:25:15 PM  Show Profile Send BEYU a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Just my 2 cents worth: I too have heard that story about jacketed bullets causing excessive barrel wear.

But, from what I have also heard, it is nothing to worry about because it would take thousands of rounds. When you think about it, the metal jackets are copper, which is much softer than the hard steel in the barrels of our carbines.

BEYU

"Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety."

- Benj. Franklin
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myname
Advanced Member



USA
214 Posts

Posted - 12/22/2017 :  4:11:18 PM  Show Profile Send myname a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Satanta - Many of the companies who used to focus on selling hard cast lead bullets have moved to selling the same lead bullets, but with a polymer coating. This is mostly the same coating imported from an Australian company, with the product trade name Hi-Tek coating. It comes in various colors. I didn't find the color selection to be a big deal for .30 Carbine loading, but it is great for my 9mm reloading. With the 9mm rounds I have two different loads, but with the same 147 grain bullets. I use Copper Red bullets for my reduced power competitive load for 16" carbine, and Green bullets for the competition load for pistols. Both make 128 power factor (speed x bullet weight)/1000 but the AR9 carbine load uses less powder to do it. So I change the metering insert and switch bullet colors. Everything else on the press stays constant. See photo of some .30 Carbine reloads I made with the coated bullets. Just coincidence these 115 grain .308 bullets happen to be the same color as the 147s I use in my AR9.
You must be logged in to see this link.

Edited by - myname on 12/22/2017 4:14:01 PM
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americanboy
Advanced Member



USA
341 Posts

Posted - 12/23/2017 :  06:19:25 AM  Show Profile Send americanboy a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I shoot the polymer coated bullets in all my guns and they do seem to shoot cleaner. I also shoot a lot of cast wheel-weight slugs, but not in my gas operated systems, only the blow-back actions or revolvers. Lead can be an issue when loaded to high-pressures in a gun like the M1-Carbine. I know people do shoot cast projectiles in the carbine, but I also know some of them use gas-checks, or load them down to around 1500 fps.
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daboone
Junior Member



USA
72 Posts

Posted - 12/23/2017 :  08:43:39 AM  Show Profile Send daboone a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Just remember handloading is better than and healthier any other addiction but it is an addiction. You are starting an adventure in education and hands on experience, They go hand in hand. A reloading manual is honestly the best place to start. The experience doing it will keep you honest about the seeking and adding to the education part for the rest of your life. This site is for each of us a useful FRIEND. Start simple and ENJOY the ride.
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Satanta
Advanced Member



USA
173 Posts

Posted - 12/23/2017 :  4:40:18 PM  Show Profile Send Satanta a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Thanks again to all for the advice. Handbook is ordered and jones'n to get a starter set ordered. Bench, desk, whatever that will do the trick with smart thrift store local shopping.
I like what I see with the Lee Anniversary package, but one says the press removes and installs primers, the next says you need the separate hand primer tool? Probably the luck of the draw when you order online.
Plus the quick trim case cutter that comes with it. Has the inside, outside chamfure (sp) But looks so awkward to use with the knob and such. I'm a lefty haha, so everything is backwards to me. That is probably a silly statement, but I'm gonna leave it in. It's probably just a very simple operation.
Last but not least. The so called breach design? Is that just the difference between a box frame compared to the C style? Or is there more to it?
As I've said before. I really try to use YouTube video's for education before coming to you guys and gals.
They are nice, but a lot of things I find are also just a waste of time. I swear, some just have nothing better to do except make a video only.
As daboone stated. This site is for each of us, a useful FRIEND. Amen to that. I have came so far and learned so much from this site with my tons of questions.
Someday, I hope to be the one helping others with advice.
But for now. I am on the learning curve. I can't keep dancing, I feel the need to pull the trigger and get committed. Manual is coming. But as I read, it would also be great to connect point A too point B with a little hands on in front of me also with a starter set.
It all seems kinda scary to me. But so was scuba diving many years ago. My dad always said. Can't never did anything.
Once again from daboone. Start simple, and ENJOY the ride. I'm in, or will be soon. Thanks again to all.
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Satanta
Advanced Member



USA
173 Posts

Posted - 12/24/2017 :  03:52:39 AM  Show Profile Send Satanta a Private Message  Reply with Quote
My Bad. Just saw a video on the use of the deluxe quick trim case trimmer. I had this vision of it being hand held. Nice to see it works from the press. Big Duh! on my part.
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americanboy
Advanced Member



USA
341 Posts

Posted - 12/24/2017 :  06:45:47 AM  Show Profile Send americanboy a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Satanta

My Bad. Just saw a video on the use of the deluxe quick trim case trimmer. I had this vision of it being hand held. Nice to see it works from the press. Big Duh! on my part.



Yep...you will need the proper die for the caliber being trimmed. This is the one I use. You can get the "plain" model for a few $$$ cheaper. The deluxe champers the case mouth as it trims. You can get a hand-held tool that champers the mouth, which is all you need. That just knocks any burrs off the mouth and I do that very lightly or not-at-all based on close inspection. The less brass you cut off the case the longer it may last.
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BEYU
Advanced Member



USA
298 Posts

Posted - 12/24/2017 :  4:19:58 PM  Show Profile Send BEYU a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I reload my own expended brass cases.

So, after the Lyman manual, the first item I ordered was a case tumbler from Frankford Armory. That cost about $30, plus the corn cob media, another $10-12 dollars, and a strainer to separate the cleaned brass from the media. My thinking was I'd need a supply of cleaned brass before I was going to start reloading.

Then a month or two later, bought the Lee carbide dies. A little after that, the Lee Classic Turret Press, digital scale, and digital caliper.

Then I designed and built my reloading bench, making sure everything would fit.

Once everything was set up, I bought the bullets, primers and powder.

So, you see, because this is a multi stage process, you can space out your purchases to fit your budget, and your progress in setting things up.

One other thing, most important you carefully research every step. As everyone will tell you, education is key. That and safety.

BEYU

"Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety."

- Benj. Franklin

Edited by - BEYU on 12/24/2017 4:22:03 PM
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Satanta
Advanced Member



USA
173 Posts

Posted - 12/24/2017 :  5:13:43 PM  Show Profile Send Satanta a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Awesome stuff. First off, I'm big on the learning. Model plastic airplanes, NO. I read after the fact, heha.
I take this very serious, yet excited to get my feet wet.
Have everything the pocket book would allow for now. No bullets, powder, or primers. Just going to work on study and set up, case prep, etc. I did order the Lee ram prime also. Was sure it did not come with the press set.
The tumbler and cleaning process will be next in line. Thanks for the info with the Armory. I will check it out.
Not knowing of course. I assume the corn cob media and strainer are a chemical process? The tumbler is for polishing. Thanks again.
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jimb16
Moderator



USA
3116 Posts

Posted - 12/24/2017 :  6:45:32 PM  Show Profile Send jimb16 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Actually, you don't really need a tumbler/vibratory cleaner although they are nice. You can get the cases nice and clean using a bath of water, dish soap and citric acid. The citric acid doesn't hurt the brass. Dump the brass in and stir. let sit for 5 minutes and stir again. Pour off the solution and save for the next batch. Rinse the brass well in clear hot water. Drain and dry. You can just let them air dry or if you are in a hurry you can bake them in the oven at 200. And for you guys who want to know how to make that degree mark, hold down the alt key and type 0176 then hit enter.

OGCA Lifer,NRA Life member, son of a 325th GIR Glider Rider
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myname
Advanced Member



USA
214 Posts

Posted - 12/25/2017 :  02:33:57 AM  Show Profile Send myname a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Regarding benches. I have made a couple of very sturdy ones by buying 3/4" thick hardwood plywood cutting in two and gluing and screwing together. 1 1/2" maple ply is some strong and stiff material. used some 1 x 2 stock for edging all the way around. Got prefab box shaped steel legs from a wood working supply shop.couple of hours to put together, and a couple of hours to stain and clearcoat.
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Satanta
Advanced Member



USA
173 Posts

Posted - 12/31/2017 :  4:18:53 PM  Show Profile Send Satanta a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Ha, I knew I would re-find the cleaning process. It was jimb16 instead of Tuna. My bad, but I have so many posts floating around it's hard to keep up per location.
Got a new and important one here.
I'm ordering, bullets and powder. I'm going with the Bayou Bullets. HI-TEK COATED PREMIUM. 115 Gr. RN
Seems like a lot of you are happy with the coated lead bullets, and I also read nothing but good on them also.
Point is: Most of you have said that the H110 is a good all round powder to use.
The Lee chart I have says to use R Enforcer or Accur #9 with the 115 Gr. lead bullet?
Dipper's are N/A so I will need to use my scales, etc. (meaning brain)
Any suggestions?
I also am saving my brass now for my CC .380 which I eventually want to start using later. I have not done any homework on powders, but want the coated lead 105 Gr. FP when I make that move. Separate powders I assume?
Sorry -- no worries, have not came close to that idea yet. Not enough brass, etc.
My powder question is my big one. The next is just simple. Tumbler's: I know they are not a must, but I want one. Some use the corn media, some use the walnut. I see the walnut has a lot of dust, but can be cleaned out before use with a sifter of sort. Has anyone used the combo together? Just curious.

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jimb16
Moderator



USA
3116 Posts

Posted - 01/01/2018 :  11:37:47 AM  Show Profile Send jimb16 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
IMR 4227 is also a good carbine powder. I reload the .380 too. I usually load with Bullseye and 95 gr. cast RN. I also do my own powder coating. Don't worry about dust in the polishing media. If you are tossing in lub'ed cases, the lube will clump the dust enough to eliminate the problem. Not that it is much of a problem anyway. I just dump them into a terry towel and shake them for a few seconds to eliminate most of the dust, very little of which stays on the cases. Crushed corn cob cleans nicely but leaves a softer finish on the cases. Crushed walnut shell leaves a higher polish. Either works fine. You should be able to get crushed CC at a local feed mill cheaply and in bulk. But make sure you get the fine and not the coarse. The coarse sticks inside the cases and sometimes packs in so that you have to dig it out. Some feed mills can get or have crushed walnut. If you can't find it there, local pet supply places usually have it as bedding material for lizards! And Yes, I have occasionally mixed them when my supplies were low. It works but there is no advantage over just crushed corn cob.

OGCA Lifer,NRA Life member, son of a 325th GIR Glider Rider
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Satanta
Advanced Member



USA
173 Posts

Posted - 01/01/2018 :  4:58:37 PM  Show Profile Send Satanta a Private Message  Reply with Quote
All good info and thanks. But since this is my virgin run, I need to focus on exactly what I'm shooting for.
Ha - good pun. My bullets will be 115 Gr. Bayou lead premium coated. The Lee chart I have shows recommended powder for the lead bullet to be R ENFORCER OR ACCUR #9 Starting loads and info is all there.
Now without trying to spin my very confused brain right now. Should I stay with the chart? Or toy with other suggestions like the IMR 4227? No mention is made of weight, grain, etc.
Just scared is all, and have so much to learn. I would like a powder that I can also use later for my .380 ACP
But for now with the learning curve. My focus is 100% 30 carbine with the lead 115 grain bullet.
If I end up with a bunch of different powders on the shelf, that will be fine also. Not going to purchase bulk for now anyway. Just want to load my first 5 and see if I still have a face left afterwards.
I did receive the Hodgdon Data Manual with my press set. But I get lost easily.
If this was for an automatic trans flow pressure chart, I would be on top of it. But that's not the case.
Bare with me. I feel bad for lack of knowledge and am probably driving you all nuts. But just trying to nail down my powder choice with a little help.
The H110 seems to be a very likeable powder for many uses. I'm good with that if I have suggestions on where to start with my 115 Gr. lead coated bullets. Most I see per use with my chart is, for jacketed bullets?
I think there has to be a reason for question with the powder change from jacketed to lead?
Thanks again all.

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jimb16
Moderator



USA
3116 Posts

Posted - 01/01/2018 :  6:00:35 PM  Show Profile Send jimb16 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Get the Lyman cast bullet reloading manual. You van fins lots of safe loads listed there. The only thing that I would caution is that many of the loads would have a lot of muzzle blast from a short barrel. But all would be safe and should function reliably. Just follow the recipes and you have nothing to worry about.

OGCA Lifer,NRA Life member, son of a 325th GIR Glider Rider
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